Saturday, October 29, 2016

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards

Halloween Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics HD Cards -

Wish you all Happy Halloween !!!!



Analogous Celebrations And Perspectives Of Happy Halloween Day-

Christian celebrate Halloween day on October 31st every year which is dedicate for dead peoples, Ghosts, Ghouls, Demons. As the history Halloween or All Hallows Eve, got hijacked. What started as a day to prepare for All Saints’ Day (November 1st), Happy Halloween Day became a spooky, evil, and candy filled observance. the day of Happy Halloween is most funny for everyone like kids and adults The key in understanding of the origins of the term Happy Halloween comes from the sense of what is “hallowed” or “holy”.  In the Lord’s Prayer, Christians pray, “Our Father, in heaven, hallowed be your name…”  In the fourth century, John Chrysostom tells us that the Eastern church celebrated a festival in honor of all saints who died. In the seventh and eighth centuries, Christians celebrated “All Saints’ Day” formally. 

Halloween is best day for all peoples because you can enjoy that day spend time with friends relatives. Halloween, or Hallowe’en (a contraction of All Hallows’ Evening), also known as Allhalloween, All Hallows’ Eve, or All Saints’ Eve, is a celebration observed in a number of countries on 31 October, the eve of the Western Christian feast of All Hallows’ Day. It begins the three-day observance of Allhallowtide, the time in the liturgical year dedicated to remembering the dead, including saints (hallows), martyrs, and all the faithful departed.

It is widely believed that many Halloween traditions originated from Celtic harvest festivals which may have pagan roots, particularly the Gaelic festival Samhain, and that this festival was Christianized as Halloween. Some academics, however, support the view that Halloween began independently as a solely Christian holiday.

Halloween activities include trick-or-treating (or the related guising), attending Halloween costume parties, decorating, carving pumpkins into jack-o’-lanterns, lighting bonfires, apple bobbing and divination games, playing pranks, visiting haunted attractions, telling scary stories and watching horror films. In many parts of the world, the Christian religious observances of All Hallows’ Eve, including attending church services and lighting candles on the graves of the dead, remain popular, although elsewhere it is a more commercial and secular celebration. Some Christians historically abstained from meat on All Hallows’ Eve, a tradition reflected in the eating of certain foods on this vigil day, including apples, potato pancakes and soul cakes.

Happy Halloween Day | Happy Halloween Images | Happy Halloween Quotes | Happy Halloween Cards | Happy Halloween Wishes | Happy Halloween HD cards | Happy Halloween Pumpkin Pics | Happy Halloween Day Costume Ideas-


The word Halloween or Hallowe’en dates to about 1745 and is of Christian origin. The word “Hallowe’en” means “hallowed evening” or “holy evening”. It comes from a Scottish term for All Hallows’ Eve (the evening before All Hallows’ Day). In Scots, the word “eve” is even, and this is contracted to e’en or een. Over time, (All) Hallow(s) E(v)en evolved into Hallowe’en. Although the phrase “All Hallows'” is found in Old English (ealra hālgena mæssedæg, all saints mass-day), “All Hallows’ Eve” is itself not seen until 1556.


History of Happy Halloween Day -


Today’s Halloween customs are thought to have been influenced by folk customs and beliefs from the Celtic-speaking countries, some of which are believed to have pagan roots. Jack Santino, a folklorist, writes that “there was throughout Ireland an uneasy truce existing between customs and beliefs associated with Christianity and those associated with religions that were Irish before Christianity arrived”. Historian Nicholas Rogers, exploring the origins of Halloween, notes that while “some folklorists have detected its origins in the Roman feast of Pomona, the goddess of fruits and seeds, or in the festival of the dead called Parentalia, it is more typically linked to the Celtic festival of Samhain, which comes from the Old Irish for “summer’s end”. Samhain (pronounced sah-win or sow-in) was the first and most important of the four quarter days in the medieval Gaelic calendar and was celebrated in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man. It was held on or about 31 October – 1 November and a kindred festival was held at the same time of year by the Brittonic Celts; called Calan Gaeaf in Wales, Kalan Gwav in Cornwall and Kalan Goañv in Brittany. For the Celts, the day ended and began at sunset; thus the festival began on the evening before 1 November by modern reckoning. Samhain and Calan Gaeaf are mentioned in some of the earliest Irish and Welsh literature. The names have been used by historians to refer to Celtic Halloween customs up until the 19th century, and are still the Gaelic and Welsh names for Halloween.

Samhain/Calan Gaeaf marked the end of the harvest season and beginning of winter or the ‘darker half’ of the year. Like Beltane/Calan Mai, it was seen as a liminal time, when the boundary between this world and the Otherworld thinned. This meant the Aos Sí (pronounced ees shee), the ‘spirits’ or ‘fairies’, could more easily come into our world and were particularly active. Most scholars see the Aos Sí as “degraded versions of ancient godswhose power remained active in the people’s minds even after they had been officially replaced by later religious beliefs”. The Aos Sí were both respected and feared, with individuals often invoking the protection of God when approaching their dwellings. At Samhain, it was believed that the Aos Sí needed to be propitiated to ensure that the people and their livestock survived the winter. Offerings of food and drink, or portions of the crops, were left outside for the Aos Sí. The souls of the dead were also said to revisit their homes seeking hospitality. Places were set at the dinner table and by the fire to welcome them. The belief that the souls of the dead return home on one night of the year and must be appeased seems to have ancient origins and is found in many cultures throughout the world. In 19th century Ireland, “candles would be lit and prayers formally offered for the souls of the dead. After this the eating, drinking, and games would begin”. Throughout Ireland and Britain, the household festivities included rituals and games intended to foretell one’s future, especially regarding death and marriage. Apples and nuts were often used in these divination rituals. They included apple bobbing, scrying or mirror-gazing, pouring molten lead or egg whites into water, and dream interpretation. Special bonfires were lit and there were rituals involving them. Their flames, smoke and ashes were deemed to have protective and cleansing powers, and were also used for divination. In some places, torches lit from the bonfire were carried sunwise around homes and fields to protect them. It is suggested that the fires were a kind of imitative or sympathetic magic – they mimicked the Sun, helping the “powers of growth” and holding back the decay and darkness of winter. In Scotland, these bonfires and divination games were banned by the church elders in some parishes. Later, these bonfires served to keep “away the devil”.

From at least the 16th century, the festival included mumming and guising in Ireland, Scotland, the Isle of Man and Wales. This involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food. It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf, similar to the custom of souling (see below). Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them. It is suggested that the mummers and guisers “personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune”. In parts of southern Ireland, the guisers included a hobby horse. A man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the ‘Muck Olla’; not doing so would bring misfortune. In Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed. F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient festival included people in costume representing the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire. In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod. In the late 19th and early 20th century, young people in Glamorgan and Orkney cross-dressed. Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and hobby horses were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were “particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers”. From at least the 18th century, “imitating malignant spirits” led to playing pranks in Ireland and the Scottish Highlands. Wearing costumes and playing pranks at Halloween spread to England in the 20th century. The “traditional illumination for guisers or pranksters abroad on the night in some places was provided by turnips or mangel wurzels, hollowed out to act as lanterns and often carved with grotesque faces”. By those who made them, the lanterns were variously said to represent the spirits, or were used to ward off evil spirits. They were common in parts of Ireland and the Scottish Highlands in the 19th century, as well as in Somerset (see Punkie Night). In the 20th century they spread to other parts of England and became generally known as jack-o’-lanterns.

How To Play Trick Or Treat Game on Halloween Day ?




Happy Halloween Day Wishes & Quotes -


I wave my wand and put on my cape and wish you lots of treats and success coming your way. Happy Halloween!

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards


Hope your day doesn’t suck like a vampire. May you have an amazing day and a freakishly scary Halloween!

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards


Wishing you an eerie, spooky, hair-raising, spell-binding Halloween!

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards


May you have a bag full of candy, bones, bats and loads of fun. Happy Halloween!

Have fun scaring the heck out of people, it’s the only day you are allowed to do so. Happy Halloween!

Wishing you a boo-tiful and woo-nderful Halloween full of treats!

Have a smashing Halloween! I promise I won’t be a witch tonight, I’ll do anything for you because it’s a very special night.

Have a groovy broom-tastic Halloween!

May you have the brightest pumpkin and be the scariest ghost in town. Happy Halloween!

May you get all the treats that you want. Happy Halloween!

Have a hair-raising, bloodcurdling evening to the best person in the world. I love you!


Happy Halloween Day Images & Cards -




A big boo to you on Halloween, may all your dreams come true and know that I love you. Enjoy the candy!

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards


May you have a fang-tastic evening, ghoul-friend! I am so lucky to have you in my life. Halloween wishes to you!

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards


May your dreams be filled with snickers, butterfingers, apples and ghosts. Happy Halloween!

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards


I wish you all the success in scaring people and eating candy! Have a fun-filled Halloween!

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards


May you have a frightening and mysterious Halloween night! Wishing you a happy Halloween!


Happy Halloween Day Costume Ideas 2016-


May your Halloween be filled with magic, spirits and treats. I wish you all the luck on this Halloween!

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards


May the candles shine bright and may you have a ghoul time on Halloween!

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards


Trick or treat, the choice is yours. May you have a happy Halloween, from my skeleton to yours.

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards


Hope you have as much fun today as the spiders and bats living in your house. Happy Halloween!

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards


May you have the best and the creepiest costume of them all. Happy Halloween!

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards


May you have a hair-raising experience, chills and thrills on Halloween!

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards


Have a horrifying, magical, blood-curdling and candy-filled bag Halloween!


Happy Halloween Day Pumpkin Pics - 


Have a happy Halloween and a toasty, scary, dark night!

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards


Have a sweet and MUMMY Halloween!

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards


Wishing you a fun, silly, scary and sweet Halloween!

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards



May your day be filled with fear and your bag stuffed with candies. Happy Halloween!

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards


On the night of Halloween, I wish you a bag full of treats, a fantasy, magic and tricks.

#60+ Happy Halloween Day Wishes Images Cards Quotes Costume Ideas Pumpkin Pics & HD Cards


Nothing deadly, nothing scary, just tricks, treats and a bag full of candy. May you have a creepy Halloween night!


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